Northport Village

 

 

Incorporation and Annexation
Although it was known by the name of Northport since at least 1837, the village of Northport was formally incorporated in 1894, the first village to do so in Huntington Township. Over the years Northport has expanded from its original borders, annexing other established communities.
Around the Revolutionary War, a concentration of 31 families began settling 1.5 miles east of Northport, around where Main Street and Route 25A now intersect. This settlement was originally known as Red Hook and changed names to Vernon Valley in 1820.
By 1874 Vernon Valley had a population of around 150 inhabitants.Vernon Valley became part of Northport in the mid-20th century.
Northport also annexed the formerly independent settlement of Crab Meadow, as well as westerm parts of the Freshpond community.

Modern Northport
After nearly a century of heavy commercial use, the waterfront which had supported the community for generations, had fallen into decay by the 1920s. The village decided to purchase the land along the harbor and created Northport Memorial Park in 1932, which is a defining feature of Northport today.
In 1967, the Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) opened the Northport Power Station, which is currently the largest oil-fired electric generating station on the East coast. The four enormous stacks are a well known landmark that can be seen as far away as Connecticut across Long Island Sound. Each stack is 600 feet tall.
The Northport Trolley which had ceased operations in 1924 enjoyed a popular revival in the 1970s and 1980s, transporting weekend tourists along Main Street. Unlike the original electric trolleys, this nostalgic replica was horse driven. It also ran on rubber automobile tires rather than utilizing the original rails which still remain a visible element of Main Street to this day.
Every September the village of Northport commemorates its rich history with the celebration of Cow Harbor Day, which follows the annual Great Cow Harbor 10K Run.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s